Blaze's Second Chance (The Sinclair Men)

By: Sam Crescent


The car safely parked, Blaze Jr. jumped out of his seat and the car and ran over to his grandparents. In that instant, Blaze noticed the difference. They were on either side of his two brothers. They usually stood side by side, but they were separated by a huge gap. This gap startled the boy, who would usually just run to the centre and be shown attention by the two. Blaze Jr. stopped, hesitant.

“Uncle Trent and Uncle Chris,” he squealed moments later, running to the middle between them.

“Hiya, little guy,” they both said, roughing his hair.

Blaze Junior shook their hands, smiling at his uncles.

Blaze watched Molly take his son, leading him into the house, her face open and smiling.

“You guys going to help me get my cases?” Blaze asked, watching his father follow behind his wife, shoulders defeated.

Trent and Chris helped him with his stuff. “Jesus, Blaze. Is Francesca joining us with how much stuff you packed?” Trent mocked.

“Stop being a pussy. I’m a single father now,” Blaze said. “Anyway, what was with Molly and Dad? They’ve never been apart like that.”

Chris and Trent looked at each other. “You’re the match-maker. You tell him,” Trent said.

“Molly demanded a divorce a couple of months ago, and Dad refused,” Chris told Blaze while glaring at Trent.

“Dad must know the way she feels about him,” Blaze said, baffled.

“Luke and John were the bright ones who told Molly to do it,” Chris said.

“Those two bastards need to learn to keep their mouth shut.” Blaze was fuming.

“I think they were right to tell her to get a divorce,” Trent said behind them.

Chris and Blaze rounded on him.

“Do you really blame her? Twenty-five years in a marriage where her husband continues to mourn the death of his first wife. To you guys she is just Molly. To me, she’s my mum. I was ten when Dad married her. She’s my mum. Dad spends most of his time saying how we don’t forget our first love, that we never love after that first one. Molly would always be second best. I don’t know about you guys, but I’d never live being second best. I hope she gets a divorce because then she could find a man who loves her rather than a dead wife.” Trent walked past his brothers and into the house.

Chris and Blaze watched him go.

“Did you know he felt like that?” Blaze asked.

“I think that’s the first time I’ve heard him speak for longer than one sentence. It looks like this summer could be quite interesting,” Chris said.

Blaze admitted that he had never heard Trent speak like that before. He usually gave a one word answer. He barely spoke or gave his opinion. He was quiet and withdrawn from everyone. Everyone, that is, except Molly. He excelled at school, staying at home and studying instead of going out partying. He never joined Blaze or Chris on nights on the town. Blaze didn’t even know if Trent had any lady friends. In fact, with regards to his youngest brother he had no idea what he liked or who he was as a person. He was never interested in Blaze or his business. What he had to say, though, made sense. Francesca had said she felt the same way. Had Molly finally given up on the love she had for his father? Blaze didn’t know how he felt about that. Molly had become a permanent feature in his life as well as his son’s. Blaze Jr. adored his Grandma, and he would be devastated if anything was to change.

“So, Matchmaker, how do you intend to help Molly and Dad?” The rumour that had started in the offices of Sinclair Industry had stuck and become Chris’s nickname at home as well.

“I’m starting to wonder if I should help. Dad is stuck in his ways, and Molly deserves more.” Chris’s voice had a hint of defeat.

“Don’t, Chris. Dad loves Molly. You know it. I know it. It’s just the two adults who don’t know it.” Blaze felt desperate.

“We know this, but is the love deep enough for Molly? I don’t want to add to that hurt.”

Blaze had no idea what Chris was talking about. Love, any love, was worth fighting for. If Molly truly loved his father then anything from him would be the world. Blaze had felt the love of a woman. A sexy, voluptuous receptionist for a very short hour had shown him love. His heart had opened that day, only to die in a phone call, a phone call that had led him to use that woman in the most despicable way.

Top Books